CHANGE OF CLOSING DATE

Hello booklovers!
Today, October 5th, will be our last day of business. We won’t have enough stock left to open tomorrow, as planned. We will be closing today at 6 PM
Thank you for your business and best wishes. Gail

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Sad News – Greenwoods’ Bookshoppe is Closing

Hello Booklovers,
Today I’m deeply saddened to announce that our last day of business will be Saturday, October 6th 10 AM – 4 PM (I wanted to extend professional courtesy and respect to David Suzuki and Jeff Rubin while selling tickets for their event on Wednesday, October 3rd – now sold out!).

My decision to close was precipitated by the recent death of my brother and business partner, Brad. He skillfully managed all store affairs and guided me on so many occasions. He was my rock.

So many thanks:
To all the authors we hosted for so many varied events and signings – You helped put us on the map and kept us there.
To all my sales reps – You were our lifeline to publishers and your hard work gave us so many opportunities.
To all my booksellers past and present (Scott, Karen, Tania, Kirt, and Renee) – You have been the wind beneath my wings, especially through this difficult time for all of us.
MOST OF ALL, to Edmonton booklovers – It has been my pleasure and privilege to have built so many relationships and to have been your bookstore of choice.

Thank you. Thank you for 33 years of wonderful support. It was a great ride and I will cherish it always.

Sincerely,
Gail

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Greenwoods’ Six with Marina Endicott

 

Now living right here in Edmonton, Marina grew up living all over Canada. Her first novel, Open Arms, was short-listed for the Amazon/Books In Canada First Novel award in 2002. Her second, Good to a Fault, was a finalist for the 2008 Giller Prize and won the 2009 Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book, Canada/Caribbean region. The Little Shadows, her latest book, longlisted for the 2011 Giller Prize, was a finalist for this year’s Governor General’s Award (and was one of our personal favourites here at Greenwoods!).  She is at work on a new novel, Hughtopia. For more about her go to her website.

1. What are you reading right now?

Food & the City, Urban Agriculture, by Jennifer Cockrall-King—makes me want to grow things
Algoma, by Dani Couture, a strangely dreamy/deeply real book which I like a lot
just beginning The Great Night, a reimagining of Midsummer Night’s Dream, by Chris Adrian
just finished City of Thieves, a great book about the siege of Leningrad, by David Benioff
I’m supposed to be reading Shell of the Tortoise by Don McKay, but after special ordering it at Greenwoods I have lost it. I hope it’s well read by whoever finds it, in whatever shop or coffee place I set it down…
…and of course the latest issue of 18 Bridges, Lynn Coady’s & Curtis Gillespie’s brilliant new magazine

2. What are some of your favourite books?

How long a list can I have?

The Beginning of Spring, Penelope Fitzgerald
Riddley Walker, Russell Hoban
Lightning, Fred Stenson
Miss Mole, E.H. Young
Mr Fox, Helen Oyeyemi
The Antagonist, Lynn Coady
The Cat’s Table, Michael Ondaatje
The Outlander, Gil Adamson
There But For The, Ali Smith

3. When is the best time of day for you to write?

Early in the morning, late in the evening, when I’m too tired to be distracted.

4. If you could have dinner with any character from a book, who would it be and why?

Riddley Walker, I think. He’d be hungry. But I’d invite a few others to keep him company: E.H.Young’s Miss Mole, and Mole from Wind in the Willows; Clover from What Katy Did and my Clover from The Little Shadows. I’d serve strawberry meringues and fresh asparagus, and wild boar for Riddley.

5. What do you like best about the city/town where you live?

The streetcar over the High Level Bridge, the river winding through the city, that my children were born here, the beauty of the trees in summer and in deep winter. Not so much in this scraggly between-time.

6. What did you want to be when you grew up?

An actress—then a little later, when I knew more, an actor (much more professional-sounding). I did spend many years in theatre, first as an actor, later as a director, finally as a playwright and dramaturge… always moving towards writing.

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Greenwoods’ Six with Janice MacDonald

Janice MacDonald writes novels, childrens’ books, academic textbooks, non-fiction works, and short stories for adults and kids. She is best known as the author of four Edmonton-set mysteries featuring academic gypsy and reluctant amateur sleuth Miranda “Randy” Craig. The latest of these, the FolkFest-themed Hang Down Your Head, was released in November 2011 and quickly became a Capital City bestseller. For more about Janice, please visit her website at http://www.janicemacdonald.net/.
1. What are you reading right now?
Risk, by Dan Gardner is downstairs on the breakfast table. I’m whipping
through an Ann Perry Monk book, Execution Dock, on my Kindle when riding the train to and from work. I just finished reveling in Marina
Endicott’s The Little Shadows, which may still be sitting on my bedside
table, but I’m about to leap into The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern
on the recommendation of my husband.
2. What are some of your favourite books?

I love everything written by Jasper Fforde and Christopher Brookmyre
and will drop anything to read their latest book. The same was true of
the late Reginald Hill. Josephine Tey’s Daughter of Time, PD James’ An
Unsuitable Job for a Woman, Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, Douglas
Coupland’s Hey, Nostradamus!, Lori Lansen’s Rush Home Road, and Louise
Erdrich’s Love Medicine are all books I attempt to foist on people
because I know they’ll be equally delighted.

Alternately, while I can normally walk away from books I dislike, I do
recall really hating Myra Breckinridge…and I mean REALLY hating it, to
the point I ripped it up and tossed it in several neighbours’ trashcans
when I was about 13 because I didn’t want my poor mother to come across
it and be poisoned by it. I don’t think I’ve done much more than throw
the occasional book across a room since then.

3. When is the best time of day for you to write?

I have reluctantly turned myself into a morning bird. When I was young,
by which I mean single and freelancing, I would write long into the
night and drag myself out of bed at the crack of Donohue, and was
outrageously surly to anyone who phoned me before noon. Now, I seize
quiet time when I can find it, which unfortunately translates to 6 am
till 9 am on weekend mornings.

4. If you could have dinner with any character from a book, who would
it be and why?

Lord Peter Wimsey (the post-Harriet version) would be an utterly
charming and well-rounded dinner companion of the highest order, but for
comfort and ease, I think I’d probably pick Mole, from The Wind in the
Willows.

5. What do you like best about the city/town that you live in?

Because Edmonton is so far from other cities, we have to do it all
ourselves. Ergo, we have a world-class symphony, opera, and ballet,
amazing theatre companies, museums and art galleries, wonderful
festivals, a strong literary scene, a fantastic university, a burgeoning
fashion industry – and yet we still act like small city folk, willing to
meet people eye-to-eye on the sidewalk and pitch in and volunteer. And,
because the streets are numbered on a grid system, you can go most
places without a map.

6. What did you want to be when you grew up?

An elevator operator.

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A Great Season for “Local Produce”

  So far, 2012 has been a great year for Edmonton & Alberta authors! The Robert Kroetsch City of Edmonton Book Prize was just award to Judy Schultz for her novel, Freddy’s War.  And there are a plethora of local offerings out this season, let us introduce you to some of them!

The Tinsmith a novel by Tim Bowling

Anson Baird, a surgeon for the Union Army, is on the front line tending to the wounded. As the number of casualties rises, a mysterious soldier named John comes to Anson’s aid. Deeply affected by the man’s selfless actions, Anson soon realizes that John is no ordinary soldier, and that he harbours a dangerous secret. Twenty years later on the Fraser River in British Columbia, Anson discovers that John has gone missing. Haunted by the violence of his past, and disillusioned with his present, Anson is compelled to discover the fate of his missing friend, a fate inextricably linked to his own.

GWG: Piece by Piece by Catherine C. Cole

Remember these slogans? “Anything Goes.” “They wear longer because they’re made stronger.” If you do, chances are,  you’ve own a few pairs of GWGs in your time.  Here, at long last, is the complete, lushly illustrated history of the Great Western Garment Company.  From its humble roots in Edmonton in 1911 to its final factory closing in 2004, GWG remains firmly fixed in the Canadian psyche.

Foodshed: An Edible Alberta Alphabet by dee Hobsbawn-Smith

In this intimate guide to Alberta’s sustainable food scene, writer, poet, professional chef, and food advocate Dee Hobsbawn-Smith profiles more than seventy-five of the province’s growers and producers. Learn the A to Z’s of each producer, from Asparagus growers to Zizania cultivators, and enjoy the twenty-six original recipes, one for each type of produce. Hobsbawn-Smith worked in Calgary for many years and now lives in Saskatoon.

Baba’s Kitchen Medicines: Folk Remedies of Ukrainian Settlers in Western Canada        by Michael Mucz

From fever to frostbite, this incomparable compendium of tinctures, poultices, salves, decoctions, infusions, plasters, and tonics will fascinate and often mortify readers from all walks of life. The comprehensiveness of Mucz’s research and interviews framed with deftly painted historical, cultural, and botanical backgrounds guarantee that this chapter of the Canadian story will continue to be told for generations to come.

Food and the City: Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution by Jennifer Cockrall-King

An award-winning food journalist examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe and chronicles a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally.

The Cure for Everything: Untangling the Twisted Messages About Health, Fitness, and Happiness by Timothy Caulfield

Want great abs? You won’t get them by using the latest Ab-Flex-Spinner-Thingy. Are you trying to lose ten pounds? Diet books are a waste of trees. Do you rely on health-care practitioners—either mainstream or alternative—to provide the cure for what ails you? Then beware! In this book, health-law expert Timothy Caulfield exposes the special interests that twist good science about health and fitness in order to sell us services and products that mostly don’t work.

Margaret and the Moth Tree by Kari & Brit Trogen

Margaret is trapped in a dreadful orphanage run by the sinister, beautiful Miss Switch. After an unsuccessful attempt to alert authorities to Miss Switch’s tyranny, Margaret is forced to endure a life of complete silence. But,  on one incredible day, Margaret hears tiny voices coming from a strange, thorny tree and discovers a community of playful moths. Together Margaret and the moths prepare a plan to end Miss Switch’s reign of terror and provide a better life for everyone.

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Greenwoods’ Six with Thomas Trofimuk

From his website:

The name Thomas Trofimuk is an obvious pseudonym. Nobody’s sure what his real name is, or what he actually looks like, or where he lives. There are Trofimuks scattered throughout Canada and US, as well as in Russia and Spain. Though there are pictures of this person in existence, it’s highly unlikely they are what they seem to be. Rumours abound. One rumour suggests his real name is Thelonious Pinsky and that he lives on Vancouver Island. A website tagged The Failed Buddhist.com suggests that he’s actually a woman, teaching at the University of Lethbridge. There is no question that this fictitious Trofimuk person writes fine poetry, short-fiction, and novels. Trofimuk has published poetry, short-fiction, and novels. Waiting for Columbus, is his third novel.

For more information on Thomas, please go to his website.

1. What are you reading right now?

I just finished Peter Geye’s Safe from the Sea, which was a wonderful read – the weather was amazing! (It’s a first novel and as with many first novels, he overshot the ending. I got to the last page and thought – hmmmmm, the ending was twenty pages ago. But this is not to take away from the story. It was a wonderful journey). So, I’m in between right now. But, I’m taking some books to Mexico with me (tomorrow), including: Ondaatje’s The Cat’s Table, The Map and the Territory, by Michel Houellebecq, and, if I can find it before I leave, Hemingway’s Boat, by Paul Hendrickson. And of course, I’m taking my own book with me. I’ll try and work a few hours each morning – before the sun and booze dull me.

2. What are some of your favourite books?

Russell Hoban’s Riddley Walker.
Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn.
Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle, and A Man without a Country.
I still love Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, and some of his short stories, “The Big Two Hearted River – parts I and II” especially.
Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion.
Robert Kroetsch’s The Studhorse Man, and Too Bad.
Gail Sobat’s The Book of Mary.
I actually read Rumi and Hafiz – enjoy the hell out of them.
Thomas Wharton’s Salamander, and The Logogryph.
Wallace Stegner’s Crossing to Safety.

(I think I could add about 50 more books to this list, but I’ll stop now…)

3. If you could have dinner with any character from a book, who would it be and why?

I’d like to sit down with a character named Nicolai Hel, out of a book by Trevanian called Shibumi. Hel is a fascinating anti-hero who is seeking personal peace in a profoundly imperfect, and for him, extremely dangerous world. Even though the book was a bit of a send-up of spy novels, there’s a philosophical undercurrent that I found irresistible –this search for Shibumi – for an understated perfection. And the character of Nicolai Hel was key to my loving this book. Hel has exquisite taste in food and wine (“Is one sip more delicious than two?”), and I think it would be an amazing dinner.

4. What do you like best about the city/town that you live in?

The profundity of the seasons. There is no question about the seasons in Edmonton. Each has its own extreme weather, and light and absence of light. There are many places on this planet where the shift between seasons is a subtle shift. Not here. And that’s part of what I love. It’s a great town in which to be a writer. It’s got an incredibly supportive and vibrant arts community. Great independent book stores. Lots of literary events…

5. When is the best time of day for you to write?

7:30 a.m. to noon. This is when I am sharp and clear. But most often, because I have a life, a daughter, a wife with a boot fetish, a fulltime day job, I write from 10 p.m. to midnight (or 1 a.m.).

6. How do you get your ideas for a book title?

The title invariably arises from the text. But I’ve always got a working title or two. Like right now, the new book was “The Ecstasy of Almost Happiness,” and then it was “The Venn Diagram of Them,” and then it was just “Venn,” and now it’s back to “The Venn Diagram of Them.” It will likely change a few more times before I land on the one.

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Greenwoods’ Six with Todd Babiak

Todd Babiak, much loved Edmonton author, spent some time answering our Greenwoods’ Six. He is the author of, among others, Choke Hold, The Garneau Block and Toby: A Man. He was a journalist for the Edmonton Journal for many years and now runs a story-making company called Story Engine.  His new novel is expected out Fall 2012. For more info on Todd, go to http://www.toddbabiak.com/

1. What are you reading right now?

I’m reading Swamplandia by Karen Russell. I thought I’d like it more than I do. 

2. What are some of your favourite books?

My favourite books, like all my favourites, are attached to memories and times in my life. The Sun Also Rises and The Great Gatsby are probably my two favourite novels, but it has more to do with my age and what was happening in my life, when I read them, than the books themselves. But they are marvelous books, light and serious at once.

3. If you could have dinner with any character from a book, who would it be and why?

Frank Bascombe, from Richard Ford’s trilogy of novels The Sportswriter, Independence Day, and The Lay of the Land. I could use a mentor or two and his sensibility, thoughtful and resigned, is very attractive to me. I like what he says about “the applauseless life” and finding honour and beauty and dignity in it.

4. What do you like best about the city/town that you live in?

The Fringe Festival: its inception, its growth, its wildness, and how it has come to define Edmonton more resonantly than anything else without any politician ever saying so.

5. When is the best time of day for you to write?

Early in the morning, when the city and my house are quiet.

 6. How do you get your ideas for a book title?

Few people know this but there’s a small shop on 124th Street and 108th Avenue that takes care of this. You walk in, you describe the theme and central conflicts in your book, and the titles of your other novels. Then you take your shirt off and just stand there for a while, in this weird silence. Two men and a woman just stand there for twelve to fourteen minutes and then they type something, on an actual typewriter. They wear black and they don’t smile. They aren’t supposed to smoke indoors but they do. It’s sort of cold in there, maybe 16 degrees. They ask for your payment, you pay, and they pull the paper out of the machine. They ask you to kindly leave. And there you have it, on your paper: the title of your next book. Oh, and this is when you put your shirt back on.

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